Internet Neutrality: Department Neutrality
May 2, 2008

Internet Neutrality is a huge global issue that is being fought by media companies and users around the world. Whether it is a grassroots effort or an advertiser effort, such as eBay, it can effect everyone if we are not careful and watchful.

“Network or “Net” Neutrality by SavetheInternet.com

“Net Neutrality is the guiding principle that preserves the free and open Internet.

Put simply, Net Neutrality means no discrimination. Net Neutrality prevents Internet providers from speeding up or slowing down Web content based on its source, ownership or destination.

Net Neutrality is the reason why the Internet has driven economic innovation, democratic participation, and free speech online. It protects the consumer’s right to use any equipment, content, application or service on a non-discriminatory basis without interference from the network provider. With Net Neutrality, the network’s only job is to move data — not choose which data to privilege with higher quality service.”

1) Keeping the communications lines neutral and open

2) No discrimination, where the providers of the channels of communication do not speed up or slow down the web content based on the destination, ownership or source.

3) Neutrality drives economic innovation, democratic participation, and free speech online.

You might be wondering why I am repeating the definition above, and no it is not because I am up late studying for my last exam. It is because I thought of a connection earlier between applying the concept and ideals of net neutrality to working within departments in an agency

What if departments…

1) Keeping the communications lines neutral and open

2) No discrimination of ideas about anything from any part, where the providers of the channels (the upper level management and executives) of communication do not speed up or slow down the content generation based on the destination, ownership or source. This one seems kind of impossible considering deadlines, I believe the number one issue impeding the perfect collaboration between departments to make truly genuine integrated ideas is Time.

3) Neutrality drives strategy innovation, democratic participation, and free speech between client teams in every specialty.

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By Jennifer Hallabough

Image Source:

Doug Ross: http://directorblue.blogspot.com/2007/10/comcasts-world-without-network.html

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Digital: A jumpstart for connections on the web
April 25, 2008

Others that know me and consider me the “techy girl”; more on a bronze/silver level than a gold. I can and do understand a lot of “webspeak” when it comes to working on the back-end of a website, know many interesting nooks and crannies on the web, and really I know how to find almost anything about anything.

This passion for the internet and all things in it has come from a basic understanding of how advertising on the web works from a metrics standpoint and a strategy standpoint. Once I understood that you can optimize on a media plan during a campaign, I was hooked.

With the realization that not understanding interactive advertising would mean “job obsoleteness” in the future, later came the epiphany that not knowing offline would accrue the same result. Hence agencies recently rolling back in their “interactive” departments into offline/online sitting in adjacent cubicles: MindShare Reveals Major Re-structuring.

In relevance to this blog about gaps in the industry and connections planning, the question of investigation is how, and if so why is connections planning alive on the web?

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Part 2: Generation Y agency competing with Boomers
April 7, 2008

We are groups of overlapping packets: we are ‘independents’ that can work together, but not always under the same roof.” -Carlos Casa

Carlos and I have been team mates in a project before. We were a part of a team that had to build, market and promote a product built for the iPod. We had to make a business plan and marketing plan, figure out prices, promotions-the works. So one year ago when Carlos announced that he and his brother were going to launch their new advertising agency, Azul & Green, I was not surprised.

Although Carlos has some involvement building a business and an idea of the advertising business, he had to build A&G from scratch, learning how to run, pitch, innovate, and keep business himself. Today, A&G is made of four people: Engelbert, Carlos, Allen, and Shiann. Engelbert handles mostly the day to day operations as well as the buying for the business and clients. Allen is their creative that has some industry experience. Shian and Carlos are more of the account planner roles: researching, talking with clients, helping creatives, etc.

“The difference now is that in the past, you had to have an office,” says Carlos.

A&G is based out of the Casas’ home, but each employee working wherever they please. They come together when they need everyone’s help, input or cooperation. They heavily rely on phone calls and e-mails to keep up to date on status and news.

Azul & Green is an agency that is relevant to one of Adbridge’s core discussions about generations and the industry. A&G is a Generation Y agency where it did not matter how much money they started with, they were going to make their own waves–and they have.

Azul & Green has more challenges but even more opportunities.

A&G is anything but short on great, innovative ideas for their clients-their challenges lie within the budgets. They might have a great idea for a billboard but the affordability of that vehicle compared to others makes it just out of reach. Carlos says they do quite a lot of collateral and newspaper within the Hispanic sector. “A lot of the time, Spanish speaking businesses will advertise in Spanish magazines and the creative will be all wrong.” Azul & Green is in a holding pattern at the moment until Carlos graduates. “We don’t mention that most of us at A&G have not graduated yet but only one client has asked and he was impressed.”

There has been opportunities and new windows opened to A&G that run horizontally to growing the agency including A&G Publishing services. The publishing division develops Spanish targeted educational posters for teachers; available via their website http://www.azulgreenpublishing.com

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Part 1: Generation Y Agency Playing in a Big Pond
March 26, 2008

About a year ago, a peer of mine, Carlos Casas, and his brother decided to start their own advertising agency in Austin, TX. What resources did they have?
Ideas, ambition and business know-how.

Carlos is a Hispanic 22 year-old advertising major at the University of Texas at Austin: College of Communications, His brother, Englebert (yes his real name) is 32 years-old. Carlos brings a combination of business sense, a love-hate relationship with advertising, and a passion for creative and ideas. While Carlos mettles in a little bit of everything within the agency, Englebert takes care of more of the day-to-day operations: ordering, purchasing print, etc. as well as the finances of the agency. Together they began Azul & Green Advertising; a small start-up shop by a Generation X & Y state-of-mind.

About two months ago, Cecelia Stewart and I had a conversation with Joel Greenberg of “Friends Talking Podcast” about how differently Boomers, Generation X and Ys work. Through speaking with Joel, we realized the ‘gap’ that exists between these generations as they work together (or try too!). The Baby Boomer generation is all about getting things organized, divvying up the work to be done, assuring everyone is doing their part. Today in the advertising industry, these are the executives running the agencies. Generation X are a few of the start up companies, trying to do what the big agencies do with little money. They don’t care how big or small they are, they know they can do it better. The Generation Y agencies have to be the most passionate and collaborative group because they have to be. They don’t care whether they start with a dime in the bank, they are mostly concerned about getting everyone’s input and working together.

This is an introduction into the conversation of “Gaps Between Generation Collaboration”. Over the next few posts, I will be discussing an interview I had with Carlos Casas about Azul & Green (A&G), and his experiences diving into an industry before he’s even received a degree in it. The most fascinating thing about A&G is that it is made up of about five people, five clients, and they are making due.

“We are groups of overlapping packets: we are ‘independents’ that can work together, but not always under the same roof.” Carlos Casas

-Jennifer Hallabough